Gabriel's Wharf, South Bank, London

This week I met up with Julia Elmore, to complete my first “London Cameos” video on the beach at Gabriel’s Wharf, on the South Bank in London – only a stone’s throw from the Royal Festival Hall and within sight of St Paul’s Cathedral.

Julia Elmore at Gabriel's Wharf, South Bank, London

Here, Julia creates a One Wheeled Thames Serpent from the flotsam and jetsam she finds on the beach. She says she often goes to Gabriel’s Wharf to create art, and she finds its temporary nature liberating. I loved making the film, and it was fascinating to watch Julia create her art, although I’m not sure I would have been able to let go so easily!

8 thoughts on “London Cameos – Gabriel’s Wharf – Project 52 – 9/52

  1. My Scanner mind went off at a tangent in the middle of this and I had to come back to it. Hats off to you, Julia; this is a wee gem! So many layers and gifts captured in such a short piece… I can almost feel the Scanner in you smiling! I enjoyed watching, learning, admiring, listening, being inspired, musing at the thoughts of those who gathered to watch both of you creating; it’s not always curiosity about the creator… people always stop to watch when someone else is watching. So many people scoff at the thought that all art is rearrangement, but we’re all filters and prisms, and how and why we arrange, edit, frame and share what comes into our lives fascinates me.

    I enjoyed the music you used, too, like I did in your Friendship piece. Film music is one of my passions, and knowing where you and I overlap, it won’t surprise you that I once tutored Media Studies and included some of Kevin McLeod’s work!
    janice recently posted..A Glimpse of GreeceMy Profile

  2. Julia Barnickle

    Thank you Janice! It’s funny, I didn’t really notice whether anyone was watching us – I was so wrapped up in the moment! I hadn’t heard that comment about art before. When you think about it, the laws of physics state that nothing can be either created or destroyed – so everything is simply a rearrangement!

    How funny that you also have a link to Kevin MacLeod – he’s my hero, when it comes to film music. 🙂

  3. It was wonderful to spend a few minutes with two Julias at the water’s edge. I completely detached from where I am to join you watching art being created in situ by the artist. Thanks for posting!
    Christine Hastie recently posted..Great Collaboration Tables – King Arthur and his KnightsMy Profile

  4. Julia Barnickle

    That’s such a lovely piece of feedback, Christine – if my video can enable you to detach from where you are, and join in with the scene, then I’m very happy!

  5. […] the lens; rarely in front of it, so when asked by Julia Barnickle to be the subject of one of her London Cameos recently, I did not hesitate. Her idea with this series is to film a number of different areas of […]

  6. I must admit to feeling calmer and breathing deeper after watching this, thank you Julia. There is a meditative quality, not only to the creation of art, but to the artistry in how you’ve put this video together – combining moving with still and music. You have both created something way beyond the sum of the parts here. Stunning.

    Oh, and I enjoyed the glimpse of London riverbank immensely! Thank you. xx
    Karen Wallace recently posted..Do You Trust Yourself?My Profile

  7. Julia Barnickle

    You’re most welcome, Karen – thank you! I must admit the music is very meditative – and I was thinking the same as you, that we created something way beyond the sum of the parts. It was a wonderful experience, and I would love to film more creatives doing their thing – especially with the backdrop of London.

  8. […] working together enhanced their creative work: Julia Barnickle posted this video as part of a video series featuring interesting London locations; Julia Elmore, shows how the creation of temporary art illustrates “letting go” on her blog, Be […]

Share Your Thought

CommentLuv badge